Tolerance as seen in nature

a-question-of-perspective.jpg

Change happens every day, just like how the sky transforms every day except if you live in the sunny city of Murcia, where it only rains a few days a year. But even there, like in any place, the length of days is not fixed. It is either shorter or longer than the day before.

I worked on A Question of Perspective photo series between Barcelona, Paris and my home village Valliguières in the South of France. The sky captivated me a lot during that period. As I peeked through the windows in all these apartments I went through (and documented in The Vertigo of Change photo series), I would look up in the sky and wait for what would come next. I was hoping that the sky could maybe give me answers to questions I had on my mind.

Sky and clouds are reflections of my life and moods—from grays to blues transitioning to warm colours at sunset and at night.

During my frequent trips to Paris, I had the opportunity to assist at a conference of Cyrille Javary, a French sinologist, at La Maison de la Chine. Having quite an interest in understanding the Chinese culture, I read some of his books these past years. If you are also interested in this subject, I highly recommend books like Understanding the I Ching, Le Discours de la Tortue, and Les Trois Sagesses Chinoises (The last two books are not yet available in English).

The conference was about the notion of Yin-Yang that has been often misunderstood and mistranslated in the Western world. He explained that Yin-Yang has something to do with transformation/change and has nothing to do with opposition as it is usually presented.

He then started the conference by reading a quote from his last book, Yin-Yang:

“Are clouds part of the sky or are they part of the Earth? It actually depends from where you are watching at them”

This quote in itself summarizes it all. I like the idea of tolerance as seen in nature. Things may look like they are from a certain perspective, and yet it may be totally different from another. But both perspectives are correct. There is not only one, but hundreds of perspectives for anything. This has been one of the priceless lessons I learned while travelling.